DIY Rain Gutter Ribbon Organization

It’s officially hump day. Hope this neat organizational product helps you get over the middle of the week. I saw a picture of this somewhere on the Internet, but was never able to find a tutorial, so I figured I’d go ahead and write one! While using brackets is a little more complicated and includes a bit of geometry, it allows you to remove the organizers rather than mounting them directly to your furniture.

Finished organizer with ribbons arranged in rainbow order!

Finished organizer with ribbons arranged in rainbow order!

Here are the materials you need:

»10 foot white vinyl 5″ severe weather gutter — $5.23
»Severe weather gutter right hand cover x 2 — $6.24 ($3.12 each)
»Severe weather gutter right hand cover x 2 — $6.24 ($3.12 each)
»Wood screws (any way to hang your brackets) — $3.92
»2.5″ Zinc corner braces, 4 pack — $3.27
»Level — $0.00
»Powerdrill with properly sized bit — $0.00
»White caulk (optional) — $0.00 (had it on hand)
»Protractor (optional) — $0.00 (had it on hand)

Materials Cost Total(before tax): $24.90

I admit this project is a little on the pricier side, but totally worth it in the end.

1. Measure the length of the space where you plan to hang your gutter. Subtract about 1/4″ – 1/2″ for the end caps. If you are going to mount it, rather than just set it on a shelf, be sure to subtract 1/2″ for the brackets.

2. Cut the vinyl gutter to length either using a handsaw or metal shears. The ends don’t have to be perfect as they will get covered up, and I warn you that you may have to cut more than once depending on how tight your space is. I probably trimmed my gutter 3 or 4 times just to maximize the space as much as possible. If you follow the subtractions above, however, hopefully you won’t have that problem.

3. Place the end caps on the gutter and test the fit. Like I said above, you may have to trim the gutter again if the gutter is not sitting level. While the gutter is in position, trace the bottom corner where you would like the supporting brackets. You will need to trace fairly far up the sides (at least halfway) to use this as a guide for your brackets. I decided to tilt the gutter fairly far forward so that it was easier to see and reach inside. I also placed my gutter “backwards,” with the tall side in the back.

Measure the angle between the back wall and closest pencil line.

Measure the angle between the back wall and closest pencil line. Mine was 60 degrees.

4. To ensure the gutter sits level and at the same tilt, use a protractor to measure the angle between the vertical back wall (or back of your furniture in my case) and the line closest to the back that you traced on the bottom of the gutter. My angle was 60 degrees between the back wall and the line closest to the back. Ensure this angle is the same on both sides. Also use a level to make sure that the two corners you traced are level.

5. After both sides are level and the angles are the same, get out your brackets. I painted my brackets with white acrylic paint. I know it won’t last long on the metal, but I just wanted them not to stand out. If you had it on hand, you might want to try painting them with spray paint to create a more permanent finish.

6. Place a bracket on the line you drew closest to the back (the one you measured the angle to) so that is is perpendicular, with the bottom (the bend) on the line. Mark the holes for mounting the bracket. Repeat on the other side.  Then drill your pilot holes for the wood screws.

7. Once you’re sure of your measurements, go ahead and mount the first bracket. The second bracket will simply sit at a 90 degree angle up against the first bracket. You can use the protractor to ensure they are at 90 degrees, mark the holes, and repeat to mount the second set of brackets. Hopefully your brackets look something like what is below.

The angle between the two brackets should be 90 degrees.

The angle between the two brackets should be 90 degrees.

8. Once again test the fit of the gutter. You may have to trim it to ensure it fits (and doesn’t bow in the middle).

(Optional) 9. Once you’re sure of the fit, line the interior edge of the gutter, up against the end cap, with white caulk. This will hold it in place and cover up any jagged edges. This just adds to the finished appearance of the ribbon organizer.

Finished but empty ribbon organizers.  Note the second organizer is just sitting on the top of the furniture.

Finished but empty ribbon organizers. Note the second organizer is just sitting on the top of the furniture.

For my second ribbon organizer, I decided I would just set it under the first rather than mounting it as I had originally planned. This makes it easier to take in and out and lessened the permanent damage to the furniture. I was lucky enough to have this unused space behind my sewing machine!

Ribbon organizers tucked away behind my sewing machine.

Ribbon organizers tucked away behind my sewing machine.

Once the caulk is dried, fill your organizers with ribbon! I am always fond of organizing things in rainbow order, as demonstrated below.

Please comment with any questions you may have!

Until tomorrow,

|The Creative Physician|

Advertisements

11 thoughts on “DIY Rain Gutter Ribbon Organization

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s